Gas flaring rises despite N.D. regulations

 

By Jennifer Oldham. The gravel road that borders Dave Hynek’s North Dakota farm is designed to carry 10 tractor- trailer trucks a day. In a recent hour period, about passed by.

The materials provided on this Web site are for informational and educational purposes only and are not intended to provide tax, legal, or investment advice. Fracking created an oil and gas revolution in the United States. In the last year, though, the oil bust has forced producers to shift their drilling into the most productive parts of the field, which also produce the most gas, according to the Department of Mineral Resources. The Myth Of Saudi America.

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Striking photos of North Dakota Play See the stunning photo series, Bakken Oil Fields, as John Mireles reveals an up close and personal view of the workers whose difficult job is drilling for oil in North Dakota’s Bakken Oil Fields.

The Bakken Ponzi Game. Let The Tar Sands Flow. The Phenomenon - With A Flaw. Behind The Boom - Lurks Depletion. Boom Leaves Hub A Bust. Is The Boom Over? Is The Bakken Profitable. Montana Oil Boom - A Lie? Montana Frustration - Heath Sputtering. Addiction To The Drill Bit. Forecasting Shale Oil Production. North America Forecast For Animated Map Of Bakken Expansion. The Bakken Frac Bubble. Oil and Money Predicament.

More Oil Then Saudi. Oil Saturations - Relevance. Drill Baby Drill The Flairing Boom - worc. What A Waste - Regulators at the state Department of Mineral Resources considered a volume limit when they wrote the rules in but rejected the idea because it would be too hard to enforce, said Alison Ritter, a spokeswoman for the agency. Overall, the program has worked, she said. At the peak of the oil boom in December , producers in North Dakota were flaring million cubic feet a day, or 25 percent of production.

By April , the volume was down to million cubic feet a day, or 8. In the last year, though, the oil bust has forced producers to shift their drilling into the most productive parts of the field, which also produce the most gas, according to the Department of Mineral Resources. The increase in production means that more gas has been flared, even though the percentage has stayed roughly flat.

By May of this year, production grew to 1. This June, shutdowns at processing plants and a pipeline operator pushed up both the volume and percentage of flaring — to 12 percent and million cubic feet — even though production stayed flat, according to the Department of Mineral Resources. The industry has also had problems obtaining rights of way for new gas lines, particularly across the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation, said Ron Ness, president of the North Dakota Petroleum Council.

Two new gas-processing plants are planned for the field, which should help reduce the amount of flaring. North Dakota surpassed California in oil production in December , then in March overtook Alaska, to become the number two oil-producing state in the country, exceeded only by Texas.

The North Dakota state government receives through severance taxes In addition to severance taxes, the state of North Dakota owns extensive mineral rights, which are leased by competitive bidding.

The federal government is also a major owner of mineral rights in the region, and leases the rights to companies in competitive bidding. Of the lease sale and royalties from the federal tracts, the federal government keeps 52 percent, and passes 48 percent on to the state of North Dakota. The industrialization and population boom has put a strain on roads, water supplies, sewage systems, and government services in the area.

Some counties have increased in population by almost double from 20, to 40, The boom has brought with it increases in crime and social problems. Law enforcement agencies have reported sharp increases in offenses, particularly violent crime, [18] drug trafficking, [19] gun crimes, [20] and prostitution.

The boom has seen dramatic increases in the infrastructure of Western North Dakota.